The U.S condemns opioids, yet, lets the FDA release pain medicine 100X’s stronger than Fentanyl.

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The U.S condemns opioids, yet, lets the FDA release pain medicine 100X’s stronger than Fentanyl.

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For those who aren’t acquainted with the opioid epidemic in America, one should know that the one thing to stay away from is Fentanyl. The drug Fentanyl itself is only one of the several different types of opioids being abused. According to the National Institute On Drug Abuse, “everyday more than 130 people in the United States die after overdosing on opioids.” They continue to state that, “The misuse of and addiction to opioids—including prescription pain relievers, heroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl—is a serious national crisis that affects public health as well as social and economic welfare”. The concern has only become worse in the United States, as there has been a very recent, yet steep, rise in Fentanyl linked death marks. Many doctors are starting to warn others that a “third major wave” of drug overdoses are going to be seen very soon.

 

With this being said, another opioid pill, Dsuvia, hit the shelves a few months ago. The pill has been designated to be used only in “health care” settings. However, the general public is starting to question this statement, especially since the Drug Enforcement Administration released a report showing that prescription drugs were responsible for the most overdose deaths of any illicit drugs since 2001. This pill has been shown to be 1,000 times more potent than morphine, and 10 times stronger than Fentanyl, yet was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in November. It was classified as a fast-acting alternative to IV painkillers used in hospitals. The only guarantee the public has on Desuvia is the FDA claiming to have “tight restrictions” on the drug, saying that it will not be available at retail pharmacies for any use.

It is up to the public now to learn and protect their communities from the growing epidemic. Prescription opioids are one of the hardest drugs to stop, since their original recreational use is for pain and injuries. However, the main problem with opioids is not the opioid drug itself, but the repercussions with the drug. Most people who do end up with an opiod addiction, have the pills stopped being prescribed or taken away, but they have no source of rehabilitation. This leads to abusing other substances as a substitute. Many people who stop the use of prescription pills like Xanax, end up being addicted to drugs, such as Heroin, as a substitute.

As more awareness comes to light, it seems that more laws and regulations for doctors are starting to be put in place. There are also families looking for alternatives to the prescription drug in order to avoid tragedy from taking place. It is time for the public to take action and learn about ways to prevent an epidemic from overtaking our communities.