Parents and Students Participate in Mock College Interviews

From+left%3A+juniors+Audrey+Fung%2C+Amy+Morrissey%2C+Caitlyn+Walsh%2C+Thiago+Hammes%2C+Margaret+Scully%2C+Max+Girard%2C+and+Kate+Stevens.
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Parents and Students Participate in Mock College Interviews

From left: juniors Audrey Fung, Amy Morrissey, Caitlyn Walsh, Thiago Hammes, Margaret Scully, Max Girard, and Kate Stevens.

From left: juniors Audrey Fung, Amy Morrissey, Caitlyn Walsh, Thiago Hammes, Margaret Scully, Max Girard, and Kate Stevens.

From left: juniors Audrey Fung, Amy Morrissey, Caitlyn Walsh, Thiago Hammes, Margaret Scully, Max Girard, and Kate Stevens.

From left: juniors Audrey Fung, Amy Morrissey, Caitlyn Walsh, Thiago Hammes, Margaret Scully, Max Girard, and Kate Stevens.

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Managing Your Future is a class that takes place once every five days for juniors and prepares them for the college application process. The class is run by the guidance counselors and features a different guidance counselor as a speaker each week. Juniors in Managing Your Future have the option to participate in one of three nights of mock college interviews, which are given by adult members of the Rye community. The purpose of these interviews is for juniors to practice good interview habits and get a feel of what college interviews are really like. This year, the mock interviews were held at 7:00 pm on March 21, March 28, and April 3. Parents and juniors shared their thoughts about their experience.

“I went into the mock interviews with the mindset of sharpening my college interview skills. The parents were very interactive and definitely gave me good advice on my interview skills and resume. I think this opportunity provided by the school is great for any RHS student looking at colleges.”—Chris Urban (Junior)

“Although everyone seemed stressed about them, I found the mock interviews to be very helpful and not at all stressful. The interviewers gave me good advice on how to improve my resume and seem less nervous. Overall, it was a good experience!” —Grace Macdonald (Junior)

“I thought the kids all did a good job, especially on the basics. Firm handshake, good eye contact all the way through. Where I think they need the most help is mentally preparing for the points that they want to make sure the interviewer knows about them when the interview is over. The best way to do this is to make a list of points you want to make and weave them into answers to likely core questions that they will be asked.  (As an example, you might want to communicate that you are a self starter, hard working, a team player and that you love challenges)—you would want to think of facts and examples that support those points and weave them into likely questions you will get. Questions like: Tell me about yourself? What are your strengths and weaknesses? What are some examples of working on a team—as both a leader and a follower? Each candidate should think about what takeaways they want the interviewer to have and they want to make sure they get those points across in the meeting.”—Peter Chapman (Interviewer)

“It was a really nice experience to be able to talk about everything I’ve done throughout high school so far. The parents who volunteered were also incredibly nice and helpful.” —Emily Sherman (Junior)